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Dr. Nathan W. Pino

Dr. Nathan W. Pino

Office: UAC 456



E-Mail: np11@txstate.edu

Dr. Pino, Professor of Sociology, earned his BS in Applied Sociology at Texas State University; and his MS and PhD in Sociology from Iowa State University.

Dr. Pino teaches courses in deviance, and globalization and development, at the graduate and undergraduate levels. He was a Fulbright scholar in Trinidad and Tobago, conducting research on police-community relations and police reform efforts in the country, in addition to teaching undergraduate and undergraduate courses at the University of the West Indies. Dr. Pino has also served as a visiting scholar at Kyungpook National University in Daegu, South Korea.

Dr. Pino's diverse research interests include the relationships between globalization, development, security sector reform efforts, and crime in an international context; sexual and other forms of extreme violence; the sociology of deviance; and the attitudes and behaviors of college students. He has also conducted research on pedagogical issues in college teaching. Dr. Pino has authored or co-authored four books, over twenty academic journal articles, and numerous book chapters and book reviews. Dr. Pino has been recognized as a “Rising Star of Liberal Arts” and a Golden Apple Awardee for scholarly activity at Texas State.

 

Books:

Robert Shanafelt and Nathan W. Pino. 2015. Rethinking Serial Murder, Spree Killing, and Atrocities: Beyond the Usual Distinctions. New York: Routledge.

Dellwing, Michael, Joe Kotarba, and Nathan W. Pino. 2014. The Death and Resurrection of Deviance: Current Ideas and Research. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ellison, Graham and Nathan W. Pino. 2012. Globalization, Police Reform, and Development: Doing it the Western Way? New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.

Pino, Nathan W. and Michael D. Wiatrowski. 2006. Democratic Policing in Transitional and Developing Countries. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate.

 

Select List of Articles:

Blaustein, Jarrett, Nathan W. Pino, Kate Fitz-Gibbon, and Rob White. 2018. “Criminology and the UN Sustainable Development Goals: The Need for Support and Critique.” British Journal of Criminology.

Nathan W. Pino, Hassan Tajalli, Chad L. Smith, and William DeSoto. 2017. “Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs by College Students for Recreational and Instrumental Purposes: Assessing the Differences.” Journal of Drug Issues. 47:4, 606-621.

Ellison, Graham, Nathan W. Pino, and Peter Shirlow. 2013. “Assessing the Determinants of Public Confidence in the Police: A Case Study of a Post-Conflict Community in Northern Ireland.” Criminology and Criminal Justice. 13:5, 552-576.


Pino, Nathan W., Gloria P. Martinez-Ramos, and William L. Smith. 2012. “Latinos, the Academic Ethic and the Transition to College.” Journal of Latinos and Education. 11:1, pp. 17-31.

Pino, Nathan W. and Lee M. Johnson. 2011. “Police Deviance and Community Relations in Trinidad and Tobago.” Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management. 34:3, pp. 454-478.

Pino, Nathan W. 2009. “Music as Evil: Deviance and Metaculture in Classical Music.” Music and Arts in Action. 2:1, pp. 37-55.

Chee, Kyong Hee, Nathan W. Pino, and William L. Smith. 2005. “Gender Differences in the Academic Ethic and Academic Achievement.” College Student Journal. 39:3, pp. 604-618.

Pino, Nathan W. 2005. “Serial Offending and the Criminal Events Perspective.” Homicide Studies. 9:2, pp. 109-148.

Pino, Nathan W. and William L. Smith. 2004. “African American Students, the Academic Ethic, and GPA.” Journal of Black Studies. 35:1, pp. 113-131.

Pino, Nathan W. 2003. “Reclaiming Deviance as a Unique Course from Criminology Re-Revisited: Entering Delinquency Into the Equation.” Teaching Sociology. 31:2, pp. 182-194.

Pino, Nathan W. 2001. “Community Policing and Social Capital.” Policing: An International
Journal of Police Strategies and Management. 24:2, pp. 200-215.

Pino, Nathan W. and Robert F. Meier. 1999. “Gender Differences in Rape Reporting.” Sex
Roles.40:11/12, pp. 979-990.

 

Links:

Google Scholar Profile

Research Gate Profile

Academia.edu Profile

Fulbright Blog